Olive Oil's Lack Of Taste Is The Thing-It Won't Catch The Attention Of The King

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Gar1eth, Dec 29, 2016.

  1. MikeBiDude

    MikeBiDude Viscount

    BTW my comments were based on unsalted butter in baking....there is food chemistry besides flavor palettes going on
     
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  2. body2body

    body2body Baron

    In France butter must have a minimum butterfat content of 82 percent, some of the finest French butter has a butterfat content as high as 86 percent. The French butter producers also allow their milk to ferment slightly after pasteurization which gives the butter a tangy,slightly acidic taste. There are now American producers making butter in the "European style". The USDA only requires a butterfat content of 80 percent on Butter. Salted butter is available in France as demi-sel, which has only an 80 percent butterfat content. It is used only as a spread, and never for cooking.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2016
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  3. Gar1eth

    Gar1eth Regent

    I reiterate-unsalted butter, in my experience is tasteless. On the other hand perhaps you will understand me better if I tell you that as a child, and still sometimes today, I would add enough Worcestershire sauce to a glass of tomato juice that the juice would turn brown.

    Gman
     
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  4. AdamSmith

    AdamSmith Count de Crisco

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  5. AdamSmith

    AdamSmith Count de Crisco

    One reason for the generally poor, thin quality of US dairy products is widespread use of Holsteins, which produce copious quantities of not very rich milk. Some organic dairies are moving back to breeds such as Guernseys that give less but much better product.
     
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  6. whipped guy

    whipped guy Regent

    Obviously one is not going to use EVO to make French fries! However, when used in all other cooking applicatons such as sautéing I have never had an issue, and EVO is the only oil that I ever have in the house.

    Interestingly, a very high quality low acidity EVO has a higher smoke point than regular EVO. Virgin is higher and as noted regular cold pressed olive oil can go even higher. Pomace which you don't want to use because it is the bottom of the barrel and contains carcinogens because it is pressed with heat has an even higher smoke point. Now that brings us to the main point. When olive oil reaches its smoking point carcinogenic free radicals are produced and that obviously should be avoided. Some oils and obviously butter have an even lower smoke point.

    So as with all things EVO when used responsibly is fine.
     
  7. Gar1eth

    Gar1eth Regent

    I have read that the idea that there are carcinogens in olive oil when it reaches its smoke point might be wrong-that there are studies that disprove it.

    Gman
     
  8. whipped guy

    whipped guy Regent

    Well I hope that's the case. Still, I would never buy Pomace Olive Oil as studies have shown that they do contain carcinogens. Plus it tastes like crapola!

    Actually from what I read some have foolishly claimed that simply heating olive oil creates free radicals and hence carcinogens. Now that tidbit of information is crapola.

    Now I still would be hesitant to go beyond the smoking point and for one obvious reason... it would totally destroy the product, and kill the flavor! Who would want to eat something burned to a crisp and would taste awful. Not I!!! Plus I would not take the chance that it might kill me!!! :eek:

    (Though who knows? Some might like the charred flavor... Heck I'm told that some crazies even think that pain is pleasure... so go figure!);)
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2016
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  9. deej

    deej Administrator

    Salt in most salted butter (in the US) is added as a preservative. Unsalted butter left unrefrigerated (on the table, for example) will go rancid much more quickly than salted butter. It pre-dates the era when most homes had refrigeration. So, yes, you're right in a way. But that does not mean it has no value or use.

    I like to cook (and eat) and keep both in the refrigerator and use each when necessary. Baking is basically alchemy. If the recipe calls for unsalted butter I'll use it. When I saute shrimp with some butter, garlic, and olive oil, I'll use salted butter.

    Just because something is old and from another era it doesn't automatically become useless. Look at most of us!
     
  10. deej

    deej Administrator

    Carcinogens or no, no oil tasted good when it burns.

    If you need an oil to use at that high a temperature use grape seed oil. It has no flavor and a much higher smoke (or flame) point, and it's healthier than vegetable oil. You end up tasting the fried chicken instead of the oil.
     
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  11. MikeBiDude

    MikeBiDude Viscount

    I use peanut oil for deep frying turkeys, etc., high. Smoke/flash point
     
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  12. AdamSmith

    AdamSmith Count de Crisco

    [​IMG]
    ;)
     
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  13. whipped guy

    whipped guy Regent

    Yes, and peanut oil is great when stir-frying with a wok as well... something I have not done in eons!
     
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  14. AdamSmith

    AdamSmith Count de Crisco

    Stir frying can make great food but your house smells like a cheap Chinese restaurant for a week. o_O One of the foods to go OUT for.
     
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  15. AdamSmith

    AdamSmith Count de Crisco

    I am, predictably, a fairy mean baker. :cool:
     
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  16. whipped guy

    whipped guy Regent

    At the risk of quoting myself, ;) I totally agree with the esteemed Mr. Smith and for some reason there is something that the Chinese do that somehow makes stir fry work better than what you can do at home. I think that the woks just get "seasoned" from constant use. So that's why I have not used a wok "in eons"!

    Now the same for Chinese egg drop soup. I can never get it to come out even as good or hpbad as in "a cheap Chinese restaurant"!
     
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  17. AdamSmith

    AdamSmith Count de Crisco

    @whipped guy, doubtless right on both, and I agree.

    My only exception was being served in their Queens apartment by the Hunan immigrant parents of a Yale friend.

    She also led our Saturday expeditions fleeing the New Haven dining halls for dinner in Chinatown, where she would order for us off the Kanji menus taped to the wall.

    Of course the Romanji menu was chockablock with sweet-and-sour this & that, and all the other goop for Murrican patrons. :rolleyes:

    But she gave us the greatest education in and exposure to real Hunan.

    PS Also of course commercial gas range tops run many times hotter than even the "high-end" home ones.
     
  18. bashful

    bashful Knight

    I have. Found them in my local store one day. Purchased green peppercorn. Nice subtle difference. Yes, expensive. Almost $10 for a small bottle.

    Recently ordered from Watkins. A little less expensive. One item I ordered was Ground Cardamom, that was only $10, vs. over $16 from Morton and Bassett. However, 1.76 oz. from Watkins vs. 1.9 oz. from Morton and Bassett. Haven't used it yet.

    Have not done a lot of comparisons, but my guess is Morton and Bassett has a larger selection.
     
  19. Epigonos

    Epigonos Marquess

    Again guys I highly recommend Penzey's for dried herbs and spices.

    At one time I had over 700 cook books. I simply enjoy looking through them to get ideas. I happen to like Ina Garten's books but like many other cookbook writers she pisses me off by NOT providing the equivalent measurements of dried herbs for fresh ones. Yes I know fresh is better than dried but damnit most of us live in cities and don’t have the space for an extensive herb garden. Yes I know I could buy fresh herbs at my local grocer store but they are usually not very fresh. Yes I know I could plant a few herbs in pots but though I love cooking I DO NOT love gardening. I have come to cutting the fresh amount of fresh herbs by half which seems to work well for me.
     
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  20. pitman

    pitman Knight

    Peanut oil is also good for popping corn.
     
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